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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 99 (some duplicates have been removed)
they are at a disadvantage, i completely agree with kleiza rice that the civil rights issue of our day is school choice and the disaster of the public schools, it is a universal law of nature that everything run by the government will become worse and more expensive over time. everything that is sold on the private market will become better and less expensive over time. like flat screen tv's, cell phones. versus the post office, public schools, and amtrak food service. and by the way, our entire health care is now going to be put in the hands -- in the capable hands of the federal government. >> one more school thing. also from "the new york times." >> i disagree. >> you may not. four decades after clashes, bottom of the again debates school busing. nearly four decades after the city was convulsed by violence over court-ordered segregation, boston is working to reduce its reliance on busing at a school system now made up of largely minority students. although court-ordered busing ended more than two decades ago, only 13% of students in boston, 13% in the public schools, today are white. and the school
against violence and rape, for equal pay and educational opportunities. on behalf of civil rights and women's rights. we've shown a bright light on women's rights from the powerful economic interest that profit at women's expense to the relishes fundamentalist. in the fall issue of "ms.," we celebrate these 40 years of impactful reporting. from the very first issue, with the abortion petition signed by 53 prominent women who had abortions when they were illegal to repeal our abortion laws. nearly 15 years before anita hill's fame mouse testimony. to our ground beaking reporting that defined genital mutilation as an international crime against women. to our 1996 look inside the taliban's regime before most of the media had even noticed right up to our 2011 story declaring rape is rape in which we revealed the f.b.i.'s 80-year-old definition of rape under counted rapes in this country by hundreds of thousands every year. that was part of a larger feminist campaign and kicked off a fire storm resulting in 140,000 e-mails and letters to the f.b.i. and attorney general demanding the de
of republicans pushing civil rights legislation, antipole tax legislation, anti-link legislation. public accommodations legislation with the democrats constantly blocking, blocking, blocking and the tricks they use these were liberal democrats. they weren't conservative democrats. you just become so frustrated that i think nixon was absolutely right. you can hear the frustration in the speeches he gave about it he said the building trades have been given long enough to -- to -- to voluntarily integrate their work forces. if they're going -- i've had it now. if they refuse to hire black people, we're going to get results now. so i supported it back then i think he was right. >> let me just add one other person's thought on affirmative action and get your response and then we'll start taking calls. this is a piece in the "new york times" this morning by a gentleman by the name of thomas eppenshade. no longer separate equal race in college, an elite college admission and college life he's the professor in [ indiscernible ] he believes affirmative action is beneficial but doesn't believe the
york mercantile exchange, civil right attorney mya wiley. attorney raul ruiz and a contributor to "the nation" magazine. thank you for being here. let me ask a question, does 7.8% wipe away wednesday night's performance? is that news story over? >> the debates will have the big impact some are predicting. there's post-debate, you know, euphoria for romney supporters and probably a little bit too much concern for obama supporters. the reality is those numbers help obama tremendously. at the same time, obama has the opportunity now to come back and do what he did the very next day. i think that was a key day for him. >> if he had that sort of debate performance and then we'd gotten job numbers that had us stuck at 8.2, then you start talking about a crisis at that point for the campaign. >> we have a chance to make it a much bigger story, precisely because the republicans have been so nice to us and delivered, for example, jack welch. the numbers were entirely fixed. he's been chimed in this morning by steve forbes, also said these have been fixed numbers. they intended for them to go do
come from? >> guest: well, my first political involvement was in the civil rights movement, where i came along at a time when if you were young and idealistic and in the south, that was--you pretty much were drawn to that. c-span: but what got you interested in that? what--what kind of a--what was the home like? >> guest: my family is quite conservative. my father is, i would say, extremely conservative. i--it was--it--it--it... c-span: is he alive? >> guest: yes, he is. my mama, bless her heart, passed on. i sometimes think it may have been my mother's fault. my mother tried--she--she was certainly, i assure you without success, to drill good manners into my head. and in some ways i think that manners are just a formal expression of how you treat people. and in--the way black people were treated before the civil rights movement, it was clear to me, was very wrong. it was an easy call. c-span: were they political conservatives, ideological conservatives, your parents? >> guest: yeah. both republicans, lifelong. c-span: you write a column about your mom. it's the last thing in the bo
, history of labor in the 20th century, one of the great triumphs of the civil rights era was for people to recognize -- for white labor to recognize that as long as black laborers were excluded from unions they were undercutting white labor as well. >> it took a while. >> it did. it took 60 years actually. so when you see this kind of cynical advertising, they're trying to use that same ploy using african-americans. and if we had any doubt about the inter-related struggles, let's look at this one issue. how many times have we seen politicians get into trouble because they had nannies who were not being paid or being paid under the tashlgs being exploited. if we look back, we don't have to go to hollywood, we don't -- >> go home. >> look back to the history. half a century ago, that exploited domestic labor would have been black women. >> that's right. >> these are the same struggles. >> absolutely. i so appreciate that. that's part of why next i get to talk about the smartest thing i have read about black folks and the presidency of president obama in four years. we're going to talk abo
when the rising tide with the fight for civil rights swept across the nation. thousands of people might age were heading down to mississippi to break the back of segregation in. i was living in cambridge at the time. this was the 1960's. a volkswagen bug. i drove across town into the black community. i was never there before. although i had grown up just outside of boston. a revered figure of the black community both the associative doctor came and i asked him may i be of use? he said yes, young man. you can. i am glad you came here to talk with me in your own home town. you don't need to go to mississippi to find injustice. you can find the struggle here. come into our schools to help our children. i walked into the headquarters and said i will be a teacher. and had never heard of certification. [laughter] i knew nothing about teaching. they did not teach you anything useful at harvard. they still don't. [laughter] the first day i taught they sent me to teach kindergarten. the first time i ever taught in my life. i was terrified. i had no idea what you do with people that size. they we
offenders and they are cunning and devious and to say their civil rights are violated, the first and 14th amendments, because they can't have a sign, you know, and halloween deck kra decorations to come into hair house, they've forfeited their right to have access to children. >> heather: and the attorney likening it to branding. and mentioning what they need to document let's look at the things required in the ordinance, or this law that was actually passed by the city of simi valley. first of all, a sign they have to post on their door, just says this, doesn't say i'm a sex offender, it says no candy or treats at this residence. they have to leave all exterior decorative and ornamental lighting off, 5:00 p.m. to midnight and, refrain from decorating their front yard and house exterior and don't answer the door to children trick-or-treating. >> essentially they are saying, you cannot try to lure these children. we know this is what you do. and we know you want children and know to -- sex with it i should say and you will not change your behavior and here, at the end of the day, when the
's against your civil rights. i don't want to get the flu shot. and to me it seems like i'm being forced into putting a virus in my body that i object to. >> we need to have a workforce available when the public needs fit they are sick and people choose to work in a hospital. >> if workers have a medical condition that prevents them from getting the shot they have to wear a mask. >>> the unemployment rate fell in september. more people returned to the labor force and hiring was steady. in this week's smart is the new rich meet one guy who took a big risk to make a career change in a brightening job market. here's christine romans. >> reporter: he wanted to switch careers from operations in i.t. to marketing and big data. in a slow jobs market that takes training and risk. >> i decided to go back to business school and i went part time and realized that i needed even more training so i left my full time position and gained internship at cbs. and that was a great gateway. so the internship plus the mba, i was able to fortunately land at met life. looking at the data more on the marketing
in the summer that year when the rising tide in the fight for civil rights swept across the nation. thousands of young people my age or heading to mississippi to try to break the back of segregation in the south. i was living in cambridge at the time. one day i simply got in my car. this was the 1916s. it was a little par. and i drove across town into the black community. i had never been in the black community before although i had grown up just outside of boston and i went to a minister, a wonderful man, some of you may recall his name. a revered figure in the black community and some close associate of dr. king and i asked him simply may i be of use? and he said yes, young man, you can. and he said i am glad you are here to talk to me in your own home town because you don't need to go to mississippi to find injustice in america. he said you can join the struggle here. come into schools and try to help our children. i walked into the headquarters of boston public school and said i am going to be a teacher. i had never heard of certification. i knew nothing about teaching. didn't teach anyth
, delivering his historic address in 1964. it was a speech that changed the national debate on civil rights. well, here we are with an election 30 days away. and the debates are in spule swing. a new book, presidential courage, three speeches that changed america, takes a look at the moments that have truly inspire period our nation. warren kozak is the author and he is here live. >> thanks for having me on. >> jamie: this is inspiring. you certainly did your homework. i read the speeches, one is four paragraphs. >> linkon's second inaugural, four paragraphs. can you believe that? >> jamie: what does it take to inspire a nation? how important are the words that the presidents and presidential candidates say? >> critical, but what we are looking at are 3 speech, three presidents, three incredibly important junctures in our history. really the most dangerous momes in our history. and these three presidents through their words were able to give the country courage to make the changes that needed to be made. you don't hear that anywhere. >> jamie: you cover fdr, jfk and lincoln. how did you pic
and immigrants, whether it's civil rights, those things are on the line. and i just hope we don't see a repeat in the debate tomorrow night of the shame of that first debate where hispanics is and women and gay people and african-americans didn't even seem to exist in domestic policy. >> so, this is irreversible damage, for suburban women. would you agree with that, terry? >> oh, absolutely. i think suburban women are going -- are not going to vote for mitt romney. i think they see right through his deception. and i think that they actually, it's incredibly offensive and demeaning to women to treat us as if we're so stupid that we would believe this kind of hoaxerism. we're looking for a president that we can take at his word. barack obama is pro-choice and he means it when he says he's pro-choice. mitt romney will say anything and do anything and he is not the right president for women. >> i think all of us in our lifetime come across people who do business deals and they will say anything they possibly can to get the deal, close the deal at closing, and mitt romney comes off as one of these
groups say it's not just about getting in. the u.s. civil rights commission says studies show that using racial preferences can hurt minorities by starting them out near the bottom of their classes. >> if they're towards the bottom of whatever class they go to, they are much more likely to give up on an ambition to major in science and engineering. >> joe johns is live outside of the supreme court for us. so joe, will this decision -- it probably will -- have implications on all college campuses? >> reporter: well, it certainly could. and you know, i have to say, this is such a hotly contested issue even now, and it has been over the years. just that last statement from the commissioner is disputed, you know. the academic mismatch, as it's called, is disputed among people on the other side who say it's unsound science. so just about every single point you look at across the board on the issue of affirmative action and preferences is disputed here in this courtroom right now. what does it come down to? perhaps a very even split. and we do know that justice elena kagan has recused herself.
. the baltimore circuit courthouse is naaeddafter him, the latt civil rights leaderr and loobyist for the naacp." mitccell's 25- year political career came to an end after peddling in 1987.he ended up spending a year aad a half in friend:"to be honest with you, i don't think it did change him. i think, for a brief but, hh was alwwys there to . - &plend aavice."mitchell's legac continues witt his family... many involved in public life. his son, cllrence the foorth,, was lso a state leeislator... he nowwhostt the c-4 radio show in baltiiore.dee. keiffer kennedys,' what e had termed "the mitcheels, to a certain royaltyy"his son spoke abouu him today on the radii, &pfittingly channeliig bobby pennedy.c4 on radio:: &chhanelinn bobby kknnedy) "ddn't make my father larger actually was. he saw wrong and triid to right it. he saw pain ann tried to heal it. and, he saw racism and tried to stop it."mitchell was 72 years old. paul gessler, fox45 news at ten. ffneral plans.... have... not yet... been madee 3 3 &p3 &p3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 p3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 &p3 i got my obamaphone obamaphooe i got my ob
. in the 20 years between 1940 and 1960 before any civil rights legislation than in the years following. most blacks lifted themselves out of policy but liberal politics and black leaders have claimed credit. what credit is there that affirmative action has worked? >> thomas is an impressive thinker and i have great respect for him. i'm not necessarily aattacking it. it's clear that the condition of black people nationally has improved greatly since the '60s, which is when affirmative action started. it's kind of an argument about whether it was because of anti-discrimination laws and just racial progress as opposed to affirmative action. we think that if you assume for the sake of argument that it was helping at first, helping to elevate people out of poverty, it has now become a machine spinning out of control. the preferences are very large, as rick said. we think it's leading people into -- it's really entrapping people to go to college that do not tell them you're not likely to do very well here. they just want to koubt their racial numbers and it's supposed to be temporary. it started i
. >> affirmative action, civil rights group rally as the supreme court revisit also race can be a factor in college admissions. and won't you be my neighbor? late night's jimmy fallon visits mr. romney's neighborhood. >> it's a beautiful day in the neighborhood. beautiful day for a neighbor. would you be mine? could you be mine? hello, neighbor. you see this? it's called a wallet. inside of a wallet, oh, that's where money goes. now, do you know what money is? i'm guessing no, because you're watching public television. >> good day. i'm andrea mitchell live in washington. the house republican hearings on last month's terrorist attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi are under way now on capitol hill. chairman darrell issa opened the hearings demanding answers from the state department about their response to the incident. as well as the amount of security personnel in place before september 11th. >> we know that the tragedy in benghazi ended as it did. we now know that, in fact, it was caused by a terrorist attack that wasp reasonably predictable to eventually happen somewhere in the world, especia
of their complaints. >> we're not being responded to a crisis that's now to the point of even a civil rights crisis. >> renters also say the security force is overly aggressive, even assaulting residents who didn't have their i.d. on them. management did not return news 4's phone calls, but a county spokesman says the management group has until october 20th to fix the violations. >>> today howard brooks, a former campaign aide to mayor gray, will be sentenced on krums charges. brooks admitted in may that he lied to the fbi about funneling money to fringe mayoral candidate suleiman brown. brown says he was paid by the gray campaign to bash then mayor adrian fenty. they expect brooks will be sentenced to probation and not jail time because he was providing substantial assistance to their investigation. brooks is one of three former aides to plead guilty to corruption charges. >>> kwame brown is under new strict rules until his sentencing next month. the u.s. district judge from 6:6 -- set a curfew from 11:30 p.m. to 6:30 a.m. he failed to report by phone three times. the former d.c. council chairman
to the point af civil rights crisis. >> and the security force is overly aggressive, even assaulting residents who don't have their ids on them. management did not return news 4's phone calls, but a county spokesperson says the management group has until october 20th to fix some of those violations. >> coming up on 5:51. time for weather and traffic on the ones. looks like we're in for a slight warmup and back down again and back up again. >> exactly. the roller coaster ride you normally get during the fall. a lot of us are just tired of being in this kind of dismal weather we've been in since sunday. it's been on the chilly side. of course, it felt like november. today we're going to move back to october. just for a day. 53 in virginia. 53 in warrenton. 56 in hunting town to our east and southeast. temperatures are ten-plus degrees above that. so kind of a mild start out there this morning. 46 to 55. damp conditions because there's a little bit of mist and a little bit of fog too. that's going to lift rather rapidly, i think, when we get to 8:00 and 9:00 a.m. this morning. we'll be improving
, the diversity of texas, which had affirmative flee been discriminating -- not against black people in the civil-rights era -- was made to end a black student, sort of in the brown versus board of education era. not directly relevant to the case, but it casts a shadow, and reminds us, in living memory, the that the state's affirmative it discriminated against a disadvantaged minority in the most pernicious way. the question is, how we move forward it enough away from those days for their not to be some effort at the mediation and an effort to make sure all aspects of society are represented in our student bodies. host: who are the players in this case? guest: fisher is supported by a small group from the project of fair representation, which has in many settings, including voting rights, taking conservative positions. on the university of texas aside is an avalanche of friend-of- the-court briefs. there are some on the other side, but for that way by a friend-of-the-court briefs, supported the diversity, for all aspects of society, including corporations and military leaders to take the view that it is
are the stakes here? >> the stakes are tremendous. >> reporter: more than 70 groups from civil rights organizations to former military leaders to some of the largest corporations in the country have all asked the court to maintain some use of race in admissions. warning the loss of diversity would harm business, the training of military leaders and the quality of education. >> all students would suffer, not just black and latino students. all students benefit from learning together inside the classroom and out. >> reporter: they've expressed the concern over the use of racial preferences, meaning affirmative action is very much on the line here today. the last time the court reviewed this, just as sandra day o'connor speculated, that race preferences might not be needed after 25 years. the court took this case for review just nine years after she said that. >> wyatt andrews at the supreme court. in a few minutes we'll ask texas governor rick perry about the supreme court case right here on "cbs this morning." >>> the captain of the italian cruise liner who ran aground and capsized has
employers and he listed his jobs as constitutional law professor and civil rights attorney. he described his work as talked a lot, wrote a memoir about my identity crisis. he was also little sketchy about the years 1985 through 1987, saying it was hard to remember who he actually worked for. but he did say he was a community organizer and his job description was described as organizing people and to train people to organize. for education, he listed occidental college, columbia university, and harvard law. listed his grades is not available. his interests were basketball, marxist literature, writing about myself, talking about myself, making money, and saving the world. and the mainstream media fell in love with this highly qualified applicant. they fell in love with him because they liked the trifecta of the first black male liberal president. it didn't hurt that he went to the college is that the mainstream media adored. sarah palin attended all kinds of colleges, she was a sportscaster, helped her husband, became mayor, and one becoming the first woman to serve as government in the state'
: more than 70 groups from civil rights organizations to former military leaders to some of the largest corporations in the country have all asked the court to maintain some use of race in admissions, warning that the loss of diversity would harm business, the training of military leaders, and the quality of education. >> all students would suffer not just black and latino students all students benefit from learning together in the classroom and outside of the classroom. >> reporter: all the courts conservative justices expressed concern over the use of racial prejudice, affirmative action is on the line. the last time the court reviewed this, justice sandra day o'connor speculated race may not be needed after 25 years. >> thanks. in just a few minutes we'll ask texas governor rick perry about the supreme court case right here on cbs "this morning." >> the kacht that italian cruise liner that ran around and capsized has been fired. reports say francesco schettino was let go in july for disregarding company policy. he says the charges are unfound and he wants to be reinstated with back p
, obviously, that she think there should be no civil rights distinction, none whatsoever, between a committed gay couple and a committed heterosexual couple. if that's the case, we really don't have a difference. >> is that what your said? >> your question to him was whether he supported gay marriage and my answer is the same as his and it is that i do not. >> wonderful. you agree. on that note, let's move to foreign policy. [laughter] >> you both have sons who are in iraq or on their way to iraq. you, governor palin, have said that you would like to see a real clear plan for an exit strategy. what should that be, governor? >> i am very thankful that we do have a good plan and the surge and the counterinsurgency strategy in iraq that has proven to work, i am thankful that that is part of the plan implemented under a great american hero, general petraeus, and pushed hard by another great american, senator john mccain. i know that the other ticket opposed this surge, in fact, even opposed funding for our troops in iraq and afghanistan. barack obama voted against funding troops there after promi
thought many long, hard court battles throughout the civil rights era to make sure these groups would not have to disclose their donors to people. so melanie is right that it's odd we are requiring disclosure of little amounts given to candidates, but not large amounts not given to candidates. i am open to adjustments on those. there can be a lot of changes made in offense, but i think there is a fundamental difference there. there has not been a retreat for disclosure. we have never had before in our countries history, tracking people's political activity. he might jump in there. one of the thing that comes to mind is the game has changed, so has the ability to turn around disclosure itemization quickly. that's one of the things that's happening. >> iowa to talk about the irs. i like talking about boring subjects attempt to beat me down like a path that could never get out of. it is supposed to regulate social welfare nonprofits. social welfare nonprofits, 501-c4 groups come in the whole idea of dark money, their primary purpose is supposed to be social welfare, right? they're suppos
's political activities from a fairly young age. >> narrator: his dad thought civil rights were worth fighting for. as a teenager, mitt was less interested in the issues than being with his dad. >> the word from his family is that he was not necessarily interested in politics as ideology. but there was always something about his father and his father's power and his father's profession that kept him around and kept him close in a way that it didn't do that for other members of his family. (newsreel music plays) >> the eyes of the nation are on san francisco as the republican party convenes to nominate its choice for president. >> narrator: and in 1964, mitt traveled with his dad to watch him take on conservative republican senator barry goldwater. >> the republican party should unequivocally repudiate extremists of the right and the left, and reject their efforts to infiltrate or attach themselves to our party or its candidates. >> mitt is absorbing all of this. he sees his father basically taking a stand and admires his father greatly for this. >> narrator: but it was barry goldwater's conven
. >> on that one? on the issue of civil rights? >> i will absolutely differ from my party. i am pro-choice candidate, i believe in equal rights for all. i would have voted to repeal don't ask, don't tell. i don't think we should have discrimination in the military, the workplace or anywhere. >> our next question is to mr. murphy. >> knowing that voters form their opinions based on political ads, how can you justify airing ads that in some cases have been determined by fact checkers to be misleading, confusing, and downright inaccurate? >> the ads that you see on tv for me right now are me in my kitchen talking to voters directly about the differences between me and linda mcmahon on critical issues. i support a middle-class tax cut. when the mcmahon includes a tax cut for the very wealthy. when history is standing up for the people in the state, whether it's taking homeless veterans of the street and giving them housing or fighting for the most vulnerable and the roof over their head because of a disability or mental illness. linda mcmahon has used her job a very different way, going
of the people who affected the civil rights movement, for example, never held elected office. you look at people who were advocates for women's suffrage or a women's right to vote, they were never elected to office. i think it's instilling that motivation in young people, look, this is your opportunity in your forum. you don't have to have a lot of money. you don't have to be famous to build a movement behind an issue you think is important. and waywire is that platform to allow them to do it. this election obviously will be impacted by the young people who show up or don't show up in an election. but i think what's important is you've got to get more people involved in the process and educated. and the other thing that waywire is a much more serious social video platform. it's not just funny youtube videos or clips. it's actually a serious discussion about issues of the day. >> then we definitely are not interested. brian? we like the funny video. >> a lot of focus obviously on the yankees, but i want to talk about a different sport, hockey. you guys build this beautiful arena in newark, it emp
, and such unlawful practice in 2b would have been a violation of the civil rights act of 1964, and the equal employment opportunity act. those things would have immediately discouraged anybody from hiring anyone because they would have been sued no matter what. this kind of stuff is outrageously bad government by any standard whether you're a democrat or republican. it doesn't make any sense. >> steve, ron baron is standing by. he's been a long-term investor and he's got a question for you as well. ron? >> hi, steve. thanks for coming on the show. >> hi, ron. it's a pleasure. nice to see you. >> great to see you, too. so i've been friends with steve and i have invested with steve since 1980 and we were one of the first investors, one of the first three investors in wynn resorts in 19 -- in 2001, 2000-2001, market cap was then $1 billion. and one of the things that was interesting to me, we went out to visit you and we stayed in your home that night and went to a show at the bellagio and we were talking through the bellagio and we saw one person after another who worked there would keep comin
administration's benign neglect of the poor and studied indifference to civil rights, a lot of those who lived through this week in overton who seem toe think the best thing about george bush is he not ronald reagan. >>> largely as a result of the policies and priorities of the reagan administration more people are becoming poor and staying poor in this country than anytime since world war ii. ♪ . >> if there is thinking left to ronald reagan's trickle down theory, done, it seems to be anxiety which seems to be trickng down through just about every segment of our society. ♪ . >> if you gave clarence thomas a little flower on his face you would think you had david duke talking. here is a man who, is against everything that has lifted the level of life of millions of blacks. ♪ . >> i hope his wife feeds him lots of eggs and butter and dies like many black men do of heart disease. that is how i feel. he is absolutely reprehensible person. ♪ . >> you've called gingrich and his ilk, your words, trickle down terrorists who base their agenda on exclusion, and fear. do you think middle class a
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 99 (some duplicates have been removed)